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20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
ballooned since the 9/11 attacks. and you're looking at cities that have made up implausible scenarios for terrorist attacks. room to cut? >> guest: i think so, yeah. i'm not an expert in the homeland security area but i'm familiar with the general point and i agree when the federal government starts giving out grants like this, there's lots of room for abuse and made-up roles and made-up responsibilities to try to get federal money. i think that has taken place to some extent in that area and i would take a hard look cutting back. >> host: isabel sawhill, what are you hearing here? >> guest: no one can disagree with the idea we ought to make sure that the government has well-performing programs. i would give the current administration pretty high marks on worrying about that. they have a whole program in place to evaluate programs and where the evidence suggests they're not working, they are trying to cut back or else reform the programs. let me give you an example, the head start program, very popular program, that put use, used as federal money to serve three and 4-year-old kids fro
much time in pennsylvania think of it as a -- a state of big cities and small towns but they may miss the -- the substantial agricultural economy that we have. agribusiness in our state is a $46.4 billion industry. 17.5% of pennsylvanians are employed in the so-called food and fiber system. and one of the questions we have to ask is: what does this all mean? well, i think it certainly means that at least we need a five-year farm bill, not -- not a short-term farm bill. we do too much of that around here on -- on other areas of public policy. we should do what we've always done in the senate long before i got here, passing five-year bills with regard to the farm bill. it does create economic opportunities in rural areas. it sustains the consumers and businesses that rely upon our rural economy. the senate-passed farm bill would reduce the deficit by approximately $23 billion through the elimination of some subsidies, the consolidation of programs, and -- and producing greater efficiencies in the delivery mechanisms in programs. now, we're having a big debate about the end of the year a
in infrastructure and roads in the cities and airports. we think that that has to happen sometime in the next ten, 20 years. we have a situation now with the borrowing costs in the construction industry and high unemployment and the time to do this is now. whether or not such a reasonable plan to make it through this political system is another question. i'm hopeful for the stimulus and the larger the deal yet of the larger the package the more revenue there is and the better the opportunity. >> on the long term unemployment i think the good news would be -- this is not a lot of good news in the situation, you know, 40 percent unemployed or anything in the previous. but i think a lot of it is still cyclical meaning if we can see the demand in the jobs will come, they will be able to hire. we should talk about what happens if this goes along that there is a serious deterioration and become structural, then in the short run i think the demand is the right thing to do. i think that can has a list of good suggestions and to jump on with another one, i think we need to keep interest rates low. the fed
challenging as it may be, holding elections in the major cities and in the northern regions would be this strong guest impossible of mali's sovereignty or territory and steps of rebuilding a democracy. the transition government is government plans and actions to the public and the crisis of legitimacy. the international community needs to harmonize its approach toward the pursuit of the polls that could lead to the legitimately elected government and military actions to detect the north. the contradictory public that take the military option off the table in the short and medium-term may only serve to emboldened the extra hauling them time to reinforce their presence. such also exacerbate fear there may be a conspiracy to breakout and to the civilian space rule out the hand of the pro-democracy forces within the country and for the work that is deeply invested in the space rule. many malians were proud of the country's democracy to consolidating the need by strengthening institutions and enhancing accountability and in the intelligence of the coup it's now been superseded by the c
or a particular city looking for that. so i think considering that we tested that we've seen there's enough interest that 30 partnerships would apply for the. that bush is i think the promise of the strategy which has been used in germany of these national manufacturing innovation hubs. and i think that is something that we are going to look to promote in a second term. >> thank you. paul friedman with every child matters. we are very, i applaud you for your comments about not having is fighting against money for children versus money for research and other vital needs. so the question is where do we find more revenue? and have you considered taxes on stock transfers, stock transactions or other kind of innovative, carbon tax, other kind of approaches were we can find new revenue so that will be possible for us to not fight amongst ourselves for resources? >> well, it's going to shock you for you and industry that i am not here to make news on new revenue. we are busy fighting right now to ensure that we have a budget agreement. it's very balanced and i think part of that balance, having en
would happen if a nuclear explosion went off in new york city so everything has to be done to prevent it it's a breeding ground for the terrorists and they do it, and as time goes on, they become more technically capable which in the past has been one of the stumbling blocks when we worked on this in the task force there were not many that could even think about building a nuclear weapon. that unfortunately is changing. >> julia was giving me the death stair which means that our time is up. i want to tell you that after you are working is happening with the hands of such experts please give them a round of applause. [applause] more now on how the budget price of the sequestration could affect the defense spending and national security. from washington journal, this is a little more than an hour. >> we are back. our conversation continues. gordon adams is the white house associate budget director for national security served from 1993 to 1997, and vice president of lexington institute here to give their perspective on sequestration and the impact on the pentagon. let's begin. what affe
or republican, rich or poor, farmer or city dweller, got full consideration in my office. and whether it was arranging a capitol tour, finding a lost social security check, pushing for legislation to reform the federal dairy program, or reviving the shipbuilding industry in wisconsin, every wisconsinite had an ally and an advocate in us. it has been the greatest honor of my life to serve these 24 years in this hallowed institution alongside my fellow senators and my staff, and as the voice for the people of wisconsin. for that, i thank you all one last time. and i yield the floor. i suggest the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: mr. harkin: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from iowa is recognized. mr. harkin: i ask the proceedings under the quorum call be dispensed with. the presiding officer: without objection, so ordered. mr. harkin: at the close of the 11th coming our good friend and colleague herb kohl is requiring after four terms of dedicated service to the people of wisconsin and the united states. as a senato
. that comes down to the county level. when that happened in miami-dade, not a republican on city council that is pushing those funds over. that's something they can handle at the county level. i think that's something at least my bipartisan standpoint everyone agrees we need more resources. as far as how me days we go, it's not for me to decide but at least in terms of resourcing i think i can help a lot of these lying issues. >> i would disagree with you on a lot of what you just said, but i do think -- [laughter] >> respectfully. >> look, maybe, it's 2012 in the united states of america. acceptable to the people voting after midnight ever. so whether it's more people would be able to vote or not, even if was the same number of people it's unacceptable. we need to do every single thing we can possibly do to avoid that. everything. that does not mean after you win a gubernatorial election that you cut the number of days, number of hours people can vote, or in ohio's case, to cut the we cannot early vote. to spend millions of dollars, millions of taxpayers dollars to fight to stop the las
i just laid out but, you know, elder -- an elder told me one time in urban cities you walk out the door, you go down the street to safeway for your food. in rural alaska, you open your door, what's in front of you, the nature that they see, is the grocery store. so when they have in our case the y.k. delta in the western part of alaska had devastating king salmon fishery loss in the sense of the qawpt of fish. when that fish is not able to be harvested to be put in the storehouses for the winter, the limited cash that they have in an area where fuel costs to heat their home are $8, $9, $12 a gallon, now have to go to not only heating they've set aside that cash for, now they have to get food shipped in. so their limited cash is now split between heating their home and putting food on the table. in fairbanks, alaska, which is urban, but outside, 40 below yesterday. so heating the home is not just like turning your heater on after work. it's a whole different ballgame. but they live off the land. it is not some hobby on the weekend, not a sports event. it's where they harvest the
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)